REINVENTING FAIR-TRADE

Everything that grows once started small. And all that grows is dynamic. It kind of moves.
Tiny Miracles is a movement that focuses on people. 
How can we create opportunities for the underprivileged to grow them out of poverty?
At Tiny Miracles we constantly give shape to this question, fine-tuning our direction.
This proces is a learning-curve and every step taken helps defining the next.
Tiny miracles happen everywhere; they happen to the people in our communities, 
they happen to us while spreading our message and they happen to you while being
part of our movement by purchasing our products and bring this story into your home.
Together we spread this message.
 
We actually started our company by coincidence in 2012. Let’s take one step back.

 
After working in India for a while, Laurien Meuter set up Tiny Miracles Foundation in a quest to do something about the huge poverty problem in Mumbai, India. She had a simple objective: to provide young girls living in the –dangerous- red light area of Mumbai, a safe place to make their homework. Her motto was “education has the future”. This was inand within a year 40 girls joined our classes.


But a year later in  parents started pulling their children out of the schools the foundation had put them. They couldn’t see the value of it and they needed their children to add to the family income. Clearly, this was not the route to go. 

In she teamed up with designer and cousin Pepe Heykoop in a mission to really change the lives of these children. Pepe first tried to come up with a product they could manufacture. It was far from easy. Most of them were illiterate and couldn’t even count. We made lots of little steps. What made it even more difficult was that Pepe was determined to not create a typical ‘fair trade product’. The product should sell itself by being attactive. You buy it because you like it, the story comes on top of that.” 






After nearly two years (!) of experimenting and designing products, which were far too difficult for people who cannot read and write, let alone make high quality design products, Pepe came up with the idea of a flat-pack folded paper vase cover. Their determination and perseverance have been rewarded; since  the vase turned out to be a runaway success.


Ever since the launch of the Paper Vase Cover, Tiny Miracles has launched products like Folded Lampshade in and Wallpaper Leaves both designed by Pepe.
 




was the year that Dutch Minister  Ploumen of Foreign Affairs & Trade came to visit. Few months later we opened a second workshop in the neighborhood. We celebrated the succes of TINY MIRACLES with all women.

Today, in Laurien and Pepe are not only providing work for over a 100 Pardeshi-women but they have set the ambition to uplift the entire community of 700 people to which the 40 girls they started off with belong.

Their dream is to enable slum communities to break out of the poverty cycle and become self-supporting middle class citizens within 10 years. With this pilot community, the Pardeshi community, they are more than halfway there.





is the year in which they should be self-supporting. Not just by creating jobs through their social enterprise but by using a model that is built on five equally important pillars; educating the children, educating the parents, providing jobs, improving living conditions through health care and fun. Find out more about the methodology of our Foundation.


The products manufactured by the women of the Pardeshi community under the brand name ‘Tiny Miracles’ are currently sold in 29 countries at over 350 stores.